A thought from Justin Hall —

A thought from Justin Hall

"E-ciggs" might be less dangerous, but they do not appear to be "safe" —
E-Cigarettes’s Effect on Cells Similar to That of Tobacco Smoke (by Daniel Cressey for Nature Magazine)

     The researchers found that the cells grown in medium exposed to the vapour of e-cigarettes showed a similar pattern of gene expression to those grown in a medium exposed to tobacco smoke (S. J. Park et al. Clin. Cancer Res. 20, B16; 2014).
     The changes are not identical, says study researcher Avrum Spira, who works on genomics and lung cancer at Boston University in Massachusetts. But “there are some striking similarities”, he says.  “They may be safer, but our preliminary studies suggest that they may not be benign,” says Spira.

"E-ciggs" might be less dangerous, but they do not appear to be "safe" —

E-Cigarettes’s Effect on Cells Similar to That of Tobacco Smoke (by Daniel Cressey for Nature Magazine)

     The researchers found that the cells grown in medium exposed to the vapour of e-cigarettes showed a similar pattern of gene expression to those grown in a medium exposed to tobacco smoke (S. J. Park et al. Clin. Cancer Res. 20, B16; 2014).

     The changes are not identical, says study researcher Avrum Spira, who works on genomics and lung cancer at Boston University in Massachusetts. But “there are some striking similarities”, he says.  “They may be safer, but our preliminary studies suggest that they may not be benign,” says Spira.

Kathy Benjamin breaks down everything you’re doing to scare women away:  6 Things Men Do To Get Laid That Science Says Turn Women Off (by Kathy Benjamin March 29, 2010)

Kathy Benjamin breaks down everything you’re doing to scare women away:  6 Things Men Do To Get Laid That Science Says Turn Women Off (by Kathy Benjamin March 29, 2010)

Women love bad boys, but don’t take my word for it — Peter Jonason at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces says being slightly evil grants a prolific sex life.

… studies have confirmed it: bad boys get the most girls. The finding may help explain why a nasty suite of antisocial personality traits known as the “dark triad” persists in the human population, despite their potentially grave cultural costs… (from NEW SCIENTIST) (the full study can be found HERE)

Women love bad boys, but don’t take my word for it — Peter Jonason at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces says being slightly evil grants a prolific sex life.

… studies have confirmed it: bad boys get the most girls. The finding may help explain why a nasty suite of antisocial personality traits known as the “dark triad” persists in the human population, despite their potentially grave cultural costs… (from NEW SCIENTIST) (the full study can be found HERE)

     The most important movies in history don’t always walk away with Academy Awards. In this podcast, you’ll hear Jack O’Brien explain what Teen Wolf can tell us about the history of race relations in America, Dan O’Brien point out that Last Action Hero was basically the 1990’s answer to Inception, and Jason Pargin (aka David Wong) argue that The Matrix deserved to win Best Picture.

     Don’t start arguing in the comments section before you throw on your headphones and click play above.

The crew at Cracked.Com share their perspective on several movies (that Teen Wolf carried concealed messages about race relations, that Last Action Hero was a smart satire of dumb action movies disguised as one, that and The Matrix was a critique of capitalism) which may turn out to be more important in the long run than their box-office and Oscar winnings would appear to indicate.

Ethan Zindler, the head of policy analysis for Bloomberg New Energy Finance, doesn’t advocate for clean energy.  For the last eight years, his job has been to summarise what financial data indicates.  What the data indicates is that clean energy is no longer “alternative” —

"I’ve been with [Bloomberg New Energy Finance] for eight years. Typically the way things work is governments put in place a supportive policy, private capital quickly thereafter flows in and you have a clean energy industry that’s built up…  That’s really been more or less the history. But we’re entering a new phase in the sense that these technologies are starting to become cost competitive without subsidies. Now, that’s not something that’s happening everywhere at the same time by any means, but it’s starting to happen in different places at different times… We’re entering a period now where its no longer theoretical that these technologies [like wind turbines and solar panels] are going to compete [with fossil fuels]… and so that’s why it’s such an interesting period and so much change is underway…  Our view is there’s a major and very abrupt transition underway in the energy sector and so we’re interested in the ‘new’ part of energy, which is new technologies that are changing how energy is produced, and also delivered and consumed.”

— emphasis added is mine.  The words are from an interview conducted by Geoff Dembicki for The Tyee.

Ethan Zindler, the head of policy analysis for Bloomberg New Energy Finance, doesn’t advocate for clean energy.  For the last eight years, his job has been to summarise what financial data indicates.  What the data indicates is that clean energy is no longer “alternative” —

"I’ve been with [Bloomberg New Energy Finance] for eight years. Typically the way things work is governments put in place a supportive policy, private capital quickly thereafter flows in and you have a clean energy industry that’s built up…  That’s really been more or less the history. But we’re entering a new phase in the sense that these technologies are starting to become cost competitive without subsidies. Now, that’s not something that’s happening everywhere at the same time by any means, but it’s starting to happen in different places at different times… We’re entering a period now where its no longer theoretical that these technologies [like wind turbines and solar panels] are going to compete [with fossil fuels]… and so that’s why it’s such an interesting period and so much change is underway…  Our view is there’s a major and very abrupt transition underway in the energy sector and so we’re interested in the ‘new’ part of energy, which is new technologies that are changing how energy is produced, and also delivered and consumed.”

— emphasis added is mine.  The words are from an interview conducted by Geoff Dembicki for The Tyee.

     A new report says that the “Canadian dream” is “a myth more than a reality” …

That’s the blunt assessment of an internal Conservative government report, an unvarnished account of the plight of middle-income families that’s in contrast to the rosier economic picture in this month’s budget.  “The market does not reward middle-income families so well,” says the report. “As a result, they get an increasingly smaller share of the earnings pie” compared with higher-income families. ~ Source

… and yet the Harpies claimed that everything was fine in the recent federal budget.  
     Granted, this was the same bunch that refused to acknowledge the onset of the last recession, and misled Canadians about the cost of purchasing the F-35s for years after it took office, so I suppose we shouldn’t be surprised.

     A new report says that the “Canadian dream” is “a myth more than a reality” …

That’s the blunt assessment of an internal Conservative government report, an unvarnished account of the plight of middle-income families that’s in contrast to the rosier economic picture in this month’s budget.  “The market does not reward middle-income families so well,” says the report. “As a result, they get an increasingly smaller share of the earnings pie” compared with higher-income families. ~ Source

… and yet the Harpies claimed that everything was fine in the recent federal budget. 

     Granted, this was the same bunch that refused to acknowledge the onset of the last recession, and misled Canadians about the cost of purchasing the F-35s for years after it took office, so I suppose we shouldn’t be surprised.

The 1 million who teach off the tenure track now make up 75 percent of all US college professors.  From a piece by Keith Hoeller:

 … college administrators, often with the collaboration of academic unions, have gone to great lengths to keep their increasing numbers of adjunct faculty secret from students, parents, legislators, accreditors, foundations, and the public … Though the devastating labor upheavals caused by the new global economy have been widely noted, this new academic labor system has been imposed with hardly any notice by the public at large.  … Wal-Mart seems to provide an apt analogy for the economic trend that has occurred in academia. Wal-Mart has become well known for keeping its number of full-time workers to a minimum, and hiring many part-time workers, with low pay, no benefits, and no job security. “There has been a widescale transformation of the faculty work force,” says Gwen Bradley, communications director for the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). “It’s reflecting what’s happening in the economy in general. Some call it the Wal-Martization of higher education. It’s much cheaper in the short term to hire part-time faculty.” 


Excerpted from “Equality for Contingent Faculty: Overcoming the Two-Tier System,” edited by Keith Hoeller.
Photo: Reuters, Kevork Djansezian, Zurijeta, Salon.Com

The 1 million who teach off the tenure track now make up 75 percent of all US college professors.  From a piece by Keith Hoeller:

 … college administrators, often with the collaboration of academic unions, have gone to great lengths to keep their increasing numbers of adjunct faculty secret from students, parents, legislators, accreditors, foundations, and the public … Though the devastating labor upheavals caused by the new global economy have been widely noted, this new academic labor system has been imposed with hardly any notice by the public at large.

 … Wal-Mart seems to provide an apt analogy for the economic trend that has occurred in academia. Wal-Mart has become well known for keeping its number of full-time workers to a minimum, and hiring many part-time workers, with low pay, no benefits, and no job security. “There has been a widescale transformation of the faculty work force,” says Gwen Bradley, communications director for the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). “It’s reflecting what’s happening in the economy in general. Some call it the Wal-Martization of higher education. It’s much cheaper in the short term to hire part-time faculty.”

Excerpted from “Equality for Contingent Faculty: Overcoming the Two-Tier System,” edited by Keith Hoeller.

Photo: Reuters, Kevork Djansezian, Zurijeta, Salon.Com

A thought about sunlight —

A thought about sunlight —

Countries that are more socially liberal and have relaxed attitudes toward sex tend to have lower rates of STDs, teen pregnancies and abortions… (from an article by Jodie Gummow for AlterNET)

 … Whether it’s the progressive views on legal prostitution, the popularity of licensed brothels, liberal stance on pornography, or controversial sex education programs which begin as early as kindergarten, one thing is certain: Switzerland is consistently rated as one of the most sexually satisfied nations around the globe…  whether it’s the progressive views on legal prostitution, the popularity of licensed brothels, liberal stance on pornography, or controversial sex education programs which begin as  early as kindergarten, one thing is certain: Switzerland is consistently rated as one of the most sexually satisfied nations around the globe… Yet, somehow, amidst all that fornicating, the Swiss still manage to have one of the lowest teen birth rates in the world. In 2012, a United Nations survey revealed that the teen birth rate in the United States was almost 10 times higher than in Switzerland … 
 … the Netherlands has a reputation as being one of the most pro-sex countries in the world thanks to its famous red light district, abundance of nude beaches and open sex education policies … Remarkably, Holland has a teen birth rate of only 5.3 per 1,000 compared with 39.1 per 1,000 in the United States, as well as a much lower abortion and HIV rates … 
 … Germany is home to some of the world’s most comprehensive sex-education programs and is known for its progressive political policies in relation to sex work … Germany fares better than the United States as far as sexually transmitted disease goes: it has one-sixth the HIV rate of the United States. 

Photo by juhy13 on iStock

Countries that are more socially liberal and have relaxed attitudes toward sex tend to have lower rates of STDs, teen pregnancies and abortions… (from an article by Jodie Gummow for AlterNET)

 … Whether it’s the progressive views on legal prostitution, the popularity of licensed brothels, liberal stance on pornography, or controversial sex education programs which begin as early as kindergarten, one thing is certain: Switzerland is consistently rated as one of the most sexually satisfied nations around the globe…  whether it’s the progressive views on legal prostitution, the popularity of licensed brothels, liberal stance on pornography, or controversial sex education programs which begin as  early as kindergarten, one thing is certain: Switzerland is consistently rated as one of the most sexually satisfied nations around the globe… Yet, somehow, amidst all that fornicating, the Swiss still manage to have one of the lowest teen birth rates in the world. In 2012, a United Nations survey revealed that the teen birth rate in the United States was almost 10 times higher than in Switzerland …

 … the Netherlands has a reputation as being one of the most pro-sex countries in the world thanks to its famous red light district, abundance of nude beaches and open sex education policies … Remarkably, Holland has a teen birth rate of only 5.3 per 1,000 compared with 39.1 per 1,000 in the United States, as well as a much lower abortion and HIV rates … 

 … Germany is home to some of the world’s most comprehensive sex-education programs and is known for its progressive political policies in relation to sex work … Germany fares better than the United States as far as sexually transmitted disease goes: it has one-sixth the HIV rate of the United States.

Photo by juhy13 on iStock